2-Ply Wood Veneer

/2-Ply Wood Veneer

Our 2-ply wood veneer has a wood-on-wood construction utilizing a thin acrylic membrane that provides the ultimate protection against bubbling, glue seepage, and telegraphing. Two-ply veneer is one of the most cost-effective wood coverings for surfaces that are less than perfect or where exceptional stability is required.

You can browse through our 2-Ply Wood Veneer Menu alphabetically or gives us a call to (502) 330-5688 for more information on wood types and pricing:

  • Latin Name: Acer saccharum Common Name(s): Hard Maple, Sugar Maple, Rock Maple Sources: Northeastern North America

    Characteristics

    Curly Maple has a heavy presence of distorted grain (figure) ranging from curly or wavy to tight fiddleback, to pleated quilted pattern. Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown. Hard Maple can also be seen with curly or quiltedgrain patterns.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.

    Workability

    Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

    Uses

    Flooring (from basketball courts and dance-floors to bowling alleys and residential), veneer, paper (pulpwood), musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and other turned objects and specialty wood items.

    Availability

    Should be moderately priced, though slightly more expensive than Soft Maple. Also, figured pieces such as birdseye, curl, or quilt are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Quercus alba Common Name(s): White Oak Sources: Eastern United States

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a light to medium brown, commonly with an olive cast. Nearly white to light brown sapwood is not always sharply demarcated from the heartwood. Quartersawn sections display prominent ray fleck patterns. Conversely, Red Oak tends to be slightly redder, but is by no means a reliable method of determining the type of oak.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight, with a coarse, uneven texture.

    Workability

    Produces good results with hand and machine tools. Has moderately high shrinkage values, resulting in mediocre dimensional stability, especially in flatsawn boards. Can react with iron (particularly when wet) and cause staining and discoloration. Responds well to steam-bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, boatbuilding, barrels, and veneer.

    Availability

    Abundant availability in a good range of widths and thicknesses, both as flatsawn and quartersawn lumber. Usually slightly more expensive than Red Oak, prices are moderate for a domestic hardwood, though thicker planks or quartersawn boards are slightly more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Microberlinia brazzavillensis Common Name(s): Zebrawood, Zebrano Sources: West Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a light brown or cream color with dark blackish brown streaks vaguely resembling a zebra’s stripes. Depending on whether the wood is flatsawn or quartersawn, the stripes can be either chaotic and wavy (flatsawn), or somewhat uniform (quartersawn).

    Grain/ Texture

    Has a fairly coarse texture and open pores. Grain is usually wavy or interlocked.

    Workability

    The wood saws well, but can be very difficult to plane or surface due to the prevalence of interlocking grain. Tearout is common. Zebrawood glues and finishes well, though a transparent pore filler may be necessary for the large open pores which occur on both dark and light surfaces.

    Uses

    Zebrawood is frequently quartersawn and used as veneer. Other uses include: tool handles, furniture, boatbuilding, and skis.

    Availability

    Zebrawood tends to be fairly expensive, though usually not as prohibitively expensive as other exotics such as Ebony or Rosewood.

  • Latin Name: Tieghemella heckelii, T. africana Common Name(s): Makore Sources: Western and Middle Africa (from Sierra Leone to Gabon)

    Characteristics

    Heartwood pink or reddish brown, sometimes with streaks of mild color variation. Yellowish sapwood can be two to three inches wide, and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Figured grain patterns (such as mottled or curly) are a common occurrence. It is very durable, and is also resistant to insect attack.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain generally straight, though interlocked or wavy grain is sometimes present. Fine even texture with good natural luster.  

    Workability

    Generally easy to work, though sections with interlocked grain can cause tearout during planing or other machining operations. Makore will react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Makore also has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters due to its high silica content. Besides this dulling effect, Makore turns well, and is easy to glue and finish.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

    Availability

    Available in lumber and veneer form. Prices should be in the mid range for an imported hardwood. Boards and veneer with figured grain patterns are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Diospyros malabarica (syn. Diospyros embryopteris, D. peregrina) Common Name(s): Black and White Ebony, Pale Moon Ebony Sources: Laos and southeast Asia

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a pale straw color, with darker black streaks throughout; some pieces may be predominantly black rather than white. Sapwood is a paler white color, not always clearly defined.

    Grain/ Texture

    Generally straight grain with a fine, uniform texture and good natural luster.

    Workability

    Generally works and turns well, though pieces can be difficult to dry without checking.

    Uses

    Turned objects, inlay, and other small wood projects.

    Availability

    This is another ultra-rare species. Not commonly available, Black and White Ebony is very expensive, on par with solid-black species of ebony.

  • Latin Name: Tectona grandis Common Name(s): Teak, Burmese Teak Sources: Native to southern Asia

    Characteristics

    Heartwood tends to be a golden or medium brown, with color darkening with age.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight, though it can occasionally be wavy or interlocked. Coarse, uneven texture and moderate to low natural luster. Raw, unfinished wood surfaces have a slightly oily or greasy feel due to natural oils.

    Workability

    Easy to work in nearly all regards, with the only caveat being that Teak contains a high level of silica (up to 1.4%) which has a pronounced blunting effect on cutting edges. Despite its natural oils, Teak usually glues and finishes well, though in some instances it may be necessary to wipe the surface of the wood with a solvent prior to gluing/finishing to reduce the natural oils on the surface of the wood.

    Uses

    Ship and boatbuilding, veneer, furniture, exterior construction, carving, turnings, and other small wood objects.

    Availability

    Despite its widespread cultivation on plantations worldwide, Teak is very expensive. It is perhaps one of the most expensive lumbers on the market, at least for large-sized, non-figured wood. Other woods are more expensive, but are typically only available in small pieces, (i.e., Gaboon Ebony or Snakewood), or they are valued solely for the figure of their grain (i.e., burl woods, Pommele Sapele, or Waterfall Bubinga).

  • Latin Name: Guibourtia ehie Common Name(s): Amazique, Amazoue, Mozambique, Ovangkol, Shedua Sources: Tropical west Africa

    Characteristics

    Varying shades of yellowish to reddish brown with darker brown, gray, or black stripes. Moderately wide sapwood is a pale yellow, clearly demarcated from heartwood. Sometimes seen with a curly or mottled grain pattern.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight to slightly interlocked. Medium to coarse texture, with moderate natural luster.

    Workability

    Overall a fairly easy wood to work, though Ovangkol contains silica and can therefore dull cutters prematurely. Also, if the grain is interlocked, or if there is other figure present in the wood, planing and other machining operations may be troublesome and cause tearout. Turns, glues and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, furniture, cabinetry, turned objects, musical instruments, and flooring.

    Availability

    Good availability for veneer. Unfigured wood is in the mid-range of imported hardwoods, though curly or figured wood is likely to be more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Acer macrophyllum Common Name(s): Bigleaf Maple Sources: Coastal regions of Pacific North America

    Characteristics

    Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from almost white, to a light golden or reddish brown, while the heartwood is a darker reddish brown. Silver Maple can also be seen with curly or quilted grain patterns.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture. The growth rings tend to be lighter and less distinct in Soft Maples than in Hard Maple.

    Workability

    Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

    Uses

    Veneer, paper (pulpwood), boxes, crates/pallets, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small specialty wood items.

    Availability

    Should be very moderately priced, though figured pieces such as curly or quilted grain patterns are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Entandrophragma cylindricum Common Name(s): Sapele, Sapelli, Sapeli Sources: Tropical Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a golden to dark reddish brown. Color tends to darken with age. Besides the common ribbon pattern seen on quartersawn boards, Sapele is also known for a wide variety of  other figured grain patterns, such as: pommele, quilted, mottled, wavy, beeswing, and fiddleback.

    Grain/ Texture

    Dark red with ribbon stripe figure and curl. Grain is interlocked, and sometimes wavy. Fine uniform texture and good natural luster.

    Workability

    Sapele can be troublesome to work in some machining  operations, (i.e., planing, routing, etc.), resulting in tearout due to its interlocked grain. It will also react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Sapele has a slight blunting effect on cutters, but it turns, glues, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

    Availability

    Should be moderately priced for regular  plainsawn or quartersawn lumber, though figured lumber and veneer can be extremely expensive, particularly pommele or quilted Sapele.

  • Attention: Prices of Bubinga wood are on the rise as many African states are no longer permitting the trade of Bubinga logs.

    Latin Name: Guibourtia spp. (G. demeusei, G. pellegriniana, G. tessmannii) Common Name(s): Bubinga, Kevazingo Sources: Equatorial Africa

    Characteristics

    Ranges from a pinkish red to a darker reddish brown with darker purple or black streaks. Sapwood is a pale straw color and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Bubinga is very frequently seen with a variety of figure, including: pommele, flamed, waterfall, quilted, mottled, etc.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain can be straight, interlocked, wavy, or anything in between. (Veneer sheets also exhibit a wide range of grain patterns.) Texture is medium to fine, with a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Easy to work overall, though depending upon the species Bubinga can have silica present, which can prematurely dull cutting edges. Also, on pieces with figured or interlocking grain, tearout can occur during planing or other machining operations. Gluing can occasionally be problematic due to Bubinga’s high density and natural oils. Turns and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, inlays, fine furniture, cabinetry, turnings, and other specialty items. Since Bubinga trees can grow so large, natural-edge slabs of the wood have also been used in tabletops and other specialized projects.

    Availability

    Should be moderately priced for an import. Figured grain patterns such as waterfall, pommele, etc. are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Acer saccharum Common Name(s): Hard Maple, Sugar Maple, Rock Maple Sources: Northeastern North America

    Characteristics

    Curly Maple has a heavy presence of distorted grain (figure) ranging from curly or wavy to tight fiddleback, to pleated quilted pattern. Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown. Hard Maple can also be seen with curly or quiltedgrain patterns.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.

    Workability

    Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

    Uses

    Flooring (from basketball courts and dance-floors to bowling alleys and residential), veneer, paper (pulpwood), musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and other turned objects and specialty wood items.

    Availability

    Should be moderately priced, though slightly more expensive than Soft Maple. Also, figured pieces such as birdseye, curl, or quilt are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Tieghemella heckelii, T. africana Common Name(s): Makore Sources: Western and Middle Africa (from Sierra Leone to Gabon)

    Characteristics

    Heartwood pink or reddish brown, sometimes with streaks of mild color variation. Yellowish sapwood can be two to three inches wide, and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Figured grain patterns (such as mottled or curly) are a common occurrence. It is very durable, and is also resistant to insect attack.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain generally straight, though interlocked or wavy grain is sometimes present. Fine even texture with good natural luster.  

    Workability

    Generally easy to work, though sections with interlocked grain can cause tearout during planing or other machining operations. Makore will react when put into direct contact with iron, becoming discolored and stained. Makore also has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters due to its high silica content. Besides this dulling effect, Makore turns well, and is easy to glue and finish.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, furniture, cabinetry, flooring, boatbuilding, musical instruments, turned objects, and other small wooden specialty items.

    Availability

    Available in lumber and veneer form. Prices should be in the mid range for an imported hardwood. Boards and veneer with figured grain patterns are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Diospyros celebica Common Name(s): Macassar Ebony, Striped Ebony, Amara Ebony Sources: Southeast Asia

    Characteristics

    Macassar Ebony has dramatic striped appearance, somewhat similar to Zebrawood. Yellow to reddish brown body with darker brown or black stripes. Sharply demarcated sapwood is pale gold color.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually straight, but can sometimes be interlocked; fine uniform texture and good natural luster.  

    Workability

    Tends to be rather difficult to work, due to its high density, blunting effect on cutters, and its occasionally interlocked grain. The wood is also prone to checking and splitting during drying, and drying defects are not uncommon. The wood is excellent for turned objects.

    Uses

    Veneer, high-end cabinetry, billiard cues, musical instruments, and other small specialty items.

    Availability

    Likely to be extremely expensive, along with most other Ebony members in the Diospyros genus. The tree grows slowly, has a very limited natural habitat, and is highly desired for the wood’s aesthetic appeal and toughness.

  • Latin Name: Taxodium distichum Common Name(s): Cypress, Baldcypress Sources: Southeastern United States

    Characteristics

    Color tends to be a light, yellowish brown. Sapwood is nearly white. Some boards can have scattered pockets of darker wood that have been attacked by fungi, which is sometimes called pecky cypress.

    Grain/ Texture

    Straight grain and medium texture to coarse texture. Raw, unfinished wood surfaces have a greasy feel.

    Workability

    Sharp cutters and light passes are recommended when working with Cypress to avoid tearout. Also, the wood has been reported by some sources to have a moderate dulling effect on cutting edges. Cypress has good gluing,  nailing, finishing, and paint-holding properties.

    Uses

    Exterior construction, docks, boatbuilding, interior trim, and veneer.

    Availability

    Prices ought to be in the mid-range for domestic woods, with clear, knot-free boards for woodworking applications costing more than construction-grade lumber.

  • Latin Name: Aningeria spp. Common Name(s): Anegre, Anigre, Aningeria Sources: East Indes, The Phillippines

    Characteristics

    Light tan, sometimes creamy, occasionally light pink. Grain texture smooth, with occasional light silica inclusions. Figure ranges from unfigured to highly figured, often with a pronounced fiddleback.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium uniform texture and a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Overall working characteristics are fair, though depending on the species used, Anigre may have silica present and therefore have a blunting effect on tools.

    Uses

    Decorative veneer and lumber for architectural millwork and occasional cabinetry.

    Availability

    Abundant

  • Latin Name: Pericopsis elata Common Name(s): Afrormosia, Afromosia, African Teak Sources: West Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is typically a yellowish brown, occasion will have an either reddish or olive hue. Color tends to darken with age. Narrow sapwood is pale yellow and is clearly differentiated from the heartwood.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually straight, though it can also be interlocked. With a fine uniform texture and good natural luster.

    Workability

    In nearly all regards, Afrormosia is easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though surfacing boards with interlocking grain may cause tearout. Other downsides include a slight blunting effect on cutting edges, and the development of dark stains if left in contact with iron in damp conditions. Afrormosia turns, glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Boatbuilding, veneer, flooring, and furniture.

    Availability

    Trade of this species is currently tightly controlled. It’s usually available as lumber in good sizes. Prices are medium to high for an imported African hardwood.