Raw Wood Veneer

/Raw Wood Veneer

Raw wood veneer ares consecutive wood sheets that match each other. It’s basically thin non-backed wood , making it an ideal and affordable option for small to medium size veneering projects.

You can browse through our Raw Wood Veneer Menu alphabetically or gives us a call to (502) 330-5688 for more information on wood types and pricing:

  • Latin Name: Pericopsis elata Common Name(s): Afrormosia, Afromosia, African Teak Sources: West Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is typically a yellowish brown, occasion will have an either reddish or olive hue. Color tends to darken with age. Narrow sapwood is pale yellow and is clearly differentiated from the heartwood.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually straight, though it can also be interlocked. With a fine uniform texture and good natural luster.

    Workability

    In nearly all regards, Afrormosia is easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though surfacing boards with interlocking grain may cause tearout. Other downsides include a slight blunting effect on cutting edges, and the development of dark stains if left in contact with iron in damp conditions. Afrormosia turns, glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Boatbuilding, veneer, flooring, and furniture.

    Availability

    Trade of this species is currently tightly controlled. It’s usually available as lumber in good sizes. Prices are medium to high for an imported African hardwood.

  • Please inquire for price.

    Latin Name: Pterocarpus Indicus Common Name(s): Amboyna Burr, Amboyna Burl, Philippine Paduak, Solomon’s Paduak, Papua New Guinea Rosewood, Narra Burl Sources: East Indes, The Phillippines

    Characteristics

    Amboyna is among the most expensive and sought-after of all burls, and is frequently sold as veneer or as small turning/craft blanks. Some suppliers specify “Red Amboyna” for material with the typical rich reddish brown heartwood, or “Golden Amboyna” for pieces with lighter yellowish brown coloration. It’s not unusual for pieces to contain sharply contrasting yellowish sapwood.

    Grain/ Texture

    Moderately fine to moderately coarse texture with a crossed and irregular grain pattern

    Uses

    Amboyna is commonly used for fine furniture, turned objects, electric guitar tops, knife/gun grips, and other small specialty wood items.

    Availability

    Rare

  • Latin Name: Aningeria spp. Common Name(s): Anegre, Anigre, Aningeria Sources: East Indes, The Phillippines

    Characteristics

    Light tan, sometimes creamy, occasionally light pink. Grain texture smooth, with occasional light silica inclusions. Figure ranges from unfigured to highly figured, often with a pronounced fiddleback.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium uniform texture and a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Overall working characteristics are fair, though depending on the species used, Anigre may have silica present and therefore have a blunting effect on tools.

    Uses

    Decorative veneer and lumber for architectural millwork and occasional cabinetry.

    Availability

    Abundant

  • Latin Name: Fraxinus excelsior Common Name(s): European Ash, Common Ash Sources: Europe and southwestern Asia

    Characteristics

    The heartwood is a light to medium brown color, though darker streaks can also be seen, which is sometimes sold as Olive Ash. Sapwood can be very wide, and tends to be a beige or light brown; not always clearly or sharply demarcated from heartwood.

    Grain/ Texture

    Has a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is almost always straight and regular, though sometimes curly or figured boards can be found.

    Workability

    Produces good results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball bats, and other turned objects such as tool handles.

    Availability

    European Ash is the European equivalent to White Ash of the United States, and both should be among the least expensive utility hardwoods available domestically, respectively. It should compare similarly to oakin terms of price.

  • Reddish white with medium flake figure.

    Price per square foot.
  • Latin Name: Terminalia superba Common Name(s): Limba, Black Limba, White Limba, Korina, Afara Sources: Tropical western Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a light yellowish to golden brown, sometimes with grey to nearly black streaks and veins. Wood with such darker figuring is referred to as Black Limba, while plain unfigured wood is called White Limba. Sapwood is a pale greyish to yellowish brown, not clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Color tends to darken with age.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight to slightly interlocked, with a uniformly coarse texture. Moderate natural luster.

    Workability

    Easy to work with both hand and machine tools. Contains a small amount of silica, but blunting effect on cutters is usually small. Glues and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, furniture, musical instruments (electric guitar bodies), and turned objects.

    Availability

    In relatively good supply and available in board and veneer form. Prices are moderate for an imported hardwood, though figured wood such as Black Limba is likely to be more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Brosimum rubescens (syn. B. paraense) Common Name(s): Bloodwood, Satine Sources: Tropical South America

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a bright, vivid red. Color can darken to a darker brownish red over time with exposure to light. Applying a thick protective finish, and keeping the wood out of direct sunlight can help slow this color shift. Well defined sapwood is a pale yellowish color, though given the typically large trunk diameters, it’s seldom seen or included in imported lumber.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually straight or slightly interlocked. Has a fine texture with good natural luster, and is also somewhat chatoyant.

    Workability

    Bloodwood is extremely dense, and has a pronounced blunting effect on cutters. The wood tends to be brittle and can splinter easily while being worked. Those persistent enough to bear with the difficulties of working with Bloodwood to the finishing stage are rewarded with an exceptional and lustrous red surface.

    Uses

    Carvings, trim, inlays, furniture, guitars, knife handles, and turned objects.

    Availability

    Widely available in wide boards, as well as smaller turning squares and blanks. Many boards exhibit only a dull reddish brown coloration; truly blood-red pieces are the ideal. Prices are moderate to moderately high for an imported hardwood.

  • Latin Name: Sequoia sempervirens Common Name(s): Redwood, Sequoia, Coast Redwood, California Redwood, Vavona (burl) Sources: Coastal northwestern United States (from southwestern Oregon to central California)

    Characteristics

    Heartwood color can range from a light pinkish brown to a deep reddish brown. Sapwood is a pale white/yellow. Curly figure or Redwood burl (sometimes referred to as “lace” or by the name Vavona) are occasionally seen.

    Grain/ Texture

    Deep red with swirling flash & figure. Grain is generally straight, though figured pieces may be be wavy or irregular. Coarse texture and low natural luster.

    Workability

    Typically easy to work with hand tools or machinery, but planer tearout can occur on figured pieces with curly, wavy, or irregular grain. Glues and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, construction lumber, beams, posts, decking, exterior furniture, and trim. Burls and other forms of figured Redwood are also used in turning, musical instruments, and other small specialty items.

    Availability

    Should be in the mid to upper price range as a construction lumber, though clear and/or figured woodworking lumber is likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: guarea cedrata Common Name(s): Bosse, Guarea Sources: West and Central Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood initially a pale pinkish brown, darkening with age to a more golden to medium brown. Pale yellowish sapwood is well defined. Can be highly figured, with grain patterns such as pommele being sought after in veneer form.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain can be straight, interlocked, wavy, or anything in between. (Veneer sheets also exhibit a wide range of grain patterns.) Texture is medium to fine, with a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Results may vary depending upon the grain of the wood: interlocked and/or quartersawn pieces can pose a difficulty planing, with tearout being common. Silica is present in this wood, causing cutting edges to blunt and dull at an increased rate. Glues, turns, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, furniture, cabinetry, inlay, flooring, boatbuilding, and turned objects.

    Availability

    Occasionally available in the United States—usually in veneer form—prices for Bosse will depend greatly on grain patterning and intensity. Overall, expect prices to be very high for strongly figured pieces of quilted or pommele veneer, with curly figure or weaker patterns in the mid to upper price range for an imported veneer.

  • Attention: Prices of Bubinga wood are on the rise as many African states are no longer permitting the trade of Bubinga logs.

    Latin Name: Guibourtia spp. (G. demeusei, G. pellegriniana, G. tessmannii) Common Name(s): Bubinga, Kevazingo Sources: Equatorial Africa

    Characteristics

    Ranges from a pinkish red to a darker reddish brown with darker purple or black streaks. Sapwood is a pale straw color and is clearly demarcated from the heartwood. Bubinga is very frequently seen with a variety of figure, including: pommele, flamed, waterfall, quilted, mottled, etc.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain can be straight, interlocked, wavy, or anything in between. (Veneer sheets also exhibit a wide range of grain patterns.) Texture is medium to fine, with a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Easy to work overall, though depending upon the species Bubinga can have silica present, which can prematurely dull cutting edges. Also, on pieces with figured or interlocking grain, tearout can occur during planing or other machining operations. Gluing can occasionally be problematic due to Bubinga’s high density and natural oils. Turns and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, inlays, fine furniture, cabinetry, turnings, and other specialty items. Since Bubinga trees can grow so large, natural-edge slabs of the wood have also been used in tabletops and other specialized projects.

    Availability

    Should be moderately priced for an import. Figured grain patterns such as waterfall, pommele, etc. are likely to be much more expensive.

  • Latin Name: Aningeria spp. Common Name(s): Anegre, Anigre, Aningeria Sources: East Indes, The Phillippines

    Characteristics

    Light tan, sometimes creamy, occasionally light pink. Grain texture smooth, with occasional light silica inclusions. Figure ranges from unfigured to highly figured, often with a pronounced fiddleback.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium uniform texture and a good natural luster.

    Workability

    Overall working characteristics are fair, though depending on the species used, Anigre may have silica present and therefore have a blunting effect on tools.

    Uses

    Decorative veneer and lumber for architectural millwork and occasional cabinetry.

    Availability

    Abundant

  • Latin Name: Lovoa trichilioides Common Name(s): African Walnut Sources: West tropical Africa

    Characteristics

    Heartwood is a golden yellow to reddish brown, sometimes with darker streaks and veins. Color tends to darken upon exposure and with age. Sapwood is a medium yellow to light gray,and is generally narrow: it can be up to 3 inches (7.5 cm) wide, and is clearly demarcated from heartwood; a narrow transition zone is sometimes present between heartwood and sapwood. African Walnut also displays a ribbon-stripe figuring on quartersawn surfaces, similar to Sapele.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually slightly interlocked, but is sometimes straight. Medium, uniform texture, with a high level of natural luster.

    Workability

    Generally easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though care must be taken to avoid tearout when surfacing interlocked grain. Turns, glues, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, flooring, furniture, cabinetry, and turned objects.

    Availability

    African Walnut is seldom seen in lumber form in the United States, (with the exception of flooring planks), and is more commonly available in veneer form. Prices for African Walnut should be moderate for an imported wood.

  • Latin Name: Pseudotsuga menziesii Common Name(s): Douglas-Fir Sources: Western North America

    Characteristics

    Can vary in color based upon age and location of tree. Usually a light brown color with a hint of red and/or yellow, with darker growth rings.  In quartersawn pieces, the grain is typically straight and plain. In flatsawn pieces, (typically seen in rotary-sliced veneers), the wood can exhibit wild grain patterns.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is generally straight, or slightly wavy. Medium to coarse texture, with moderate natural luster.

    Workability

    Typically machines well, but has a moderate blunting effect on cutters. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood, and structural/construction lumber.

    Availability

    Should be widely available as construction lumber for a modest price. Old growth or reclaimed boards can be much more expensive.

  • Price per square foot.
  • Latin Name: Platanus occidentalis Common Name(s): Sycamore, American Plane Sources: Eastern United States

    Characteristics

    Similar to maple, the wood of Sycamore trees is predominantly comprised of the sapwood, with some darker heartwood streaks also found in most boards. (Though it is not uncommon to also see entire boards of heartwood too.) The sapwood is white to light tan, while the heartwood is a darker reddish brown. Sycamore also has very distinct ray flecks present on quartersawn surfaces—giving it a freckled appearance—and it is sometimes even called “Lacewood.”

    Grain/ Texture

    Sycamore has a fine and even texture that is very similar to maple. The grain is interlocked.

    Workability

    Overall, Sycamore works easily with both hand and machine tools, though the interlocked grain can be troublesome in surfacing and machining operations at times. Sycamore turns, glues, and finishes well. Responds poorly to steam bending.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood,  interior trim, pallets/crates, flooring, furniture, particleboard, paper (pulpwood), tool handles, and other turned objects.

    Availability

    Usually moderately priced, though Sycamore is commonly sold as quartersawn boards, which can increase the cost.

  • Latin Name: Eucalyptus globules Common Name(s): Pompas Oak, Lyptus, Tasmanian Oak, Chilean Oak Sources: South Africa

    Characteristics

    Eucalyptus is a lively veneer prized for the exotic, shimmering ripple effect in its grain. It’s available in a wide range of colors in its natural state—as well as a rich chocolate-brown when fumed, replicating the look of rich African or tropical woods. Eucalyptus produces a range of outstanding figures—most notably a strong fiddleback or bee’s wing figure—and stunning burls that are typically larger than most burls, producing well-sized sheets of rotary cut veneer. 

    Grain/ Texture

    Has a medium texture and small to medium sized open pores. The grain tends to be straight and even. Also, since the wood is grown and pruned on a plantation, there tends to be few knots or other abnormal grain patterns.

    Workability

    Generally easy to work, though it can burn easily. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Uses

    Acoustic Panels, Architectural Panels, Cabinetry, Ceilings, Conference Tables, Doors, Millwork, Store Fixtures

    Availability

    Should be reasonably priced, especially  for an import. (This is most likely due to the source of the wood: which is exclusively grown on plantations.).

  • Latin Name: Platanus occidentalis Common Name(s): Sycamore, American Plane Sources: Eastern United States

    Characteristics

    Similar to maple, the wood of Sycamore trees is predominantly comprised of the sapwood, with some darker heartwood streaks also found in most boards. (Though it is not uncommon to also see entire boards of heartwood too.) The sapwood is white to light tan, while the heartwood is a darker reddish brown. Sycamore also has very distinct ray flecks present on quartersawn surfaces—giving it a freckled appearance—and it is sometimes even called “Lacewood.”

    Grain/ Texture

    Sycamore has a fine and even texture that is very similar to maple. The grain is interlocked.

    Workability

    Overall, Sycamore works easily with both hand and machine tools, though the interlocked grain can be troublesome in surfacing and machining operations at times. Sycamore turns, glues, and finishes well. Responds poorly to steam bending.

    Uses

    Veneer, plywood,  interior trim, pallets/crates, flooring, furniture, particleboard, paper (pulpwood), tool handles, and other turned objects.

    Availability

    Usually moderately priced, though Sycamore is commonly sold as quartersawn boards, which can increase the cost.

  • Latin Name: Prunus serotina Common Name(s): American Black Cherry Sources: USA, Canada

    Characteristics

    American cherry is a timeless and elegant veneer that has a satiny finish and fine, lustrous grain marked with natural pitch flecks and small gum pockets. Typically darker than European cherry, the veneer can vary widely in color from pale pink to reddish brown. Flat cut, it produces a beautiful cathedral pattern. Figured, it exhibits a fine fiddleback or rope figure. 

    Grain/ Texture

    The grain is usually straight and easy to work—with the exception of figured pieces with curly grain patterns. Has a fine, even texture with moderate natural luster.

    Workability

    Cherry is known as being one of the best all-around woods for workability. It is stable, straight-grained, and machines well. The only difficulties typically arise if the wood is being stained, as it can sometimes give blotchy results—using a sanding sealer prior to staining, or using a gel-based stain is recommended. Sapwood is common, and may contribute to a high wastage factor.

    Uses

    Acoustic Panels, Architectural Panels, Cabinetry, Ceilings, Conference Tables, Doors, Marquetry, Millwork, Residential Furniture, Store Fixtures, Systems Furniture

    Availability

    Since Cherry is a domestic lumber, prices should be moderate, though it should typically cost more than oak or maple, usually close to the price of walnut.

  • Latin Name: Juglans regia Common Name(s): English Walnut, Circassian Walnut, European Walnut, French Walnut, Common Walnut Sources: Eastern Europe and western Asia

    Characteristics

    French Walnut can range from a lighter pale brown to a dark chocolate brown with darker brown streaks. Color can sometimes have a gray, purple, or reddish cast. Sapwood is nearly white. European Walnut can occasionally also be found with figured grain patterns such as: curly, crotch, and burl.

    Grain/ Texture

    Grain is usually straight, but can be irregular. Has a medium texture and moderate natural luster. 

    Workability

    Typically easy to work provided the grain is straight and regular. Planer tearout can sometimes be a problem when surfacing pieces with irregular or figured grain. Glues, stains, and finishes well, (though walnut is rarely stained).

    Uses

    Furniture, cabinetry, gunstocks, interior paneling, veneer, turned items, and other small wooden objects and novelties.

    Availability

    French Walnut is likely to be rather expensive, and is sometimes only seen in veneer form.

  • Price per square foot.