Latin Name: Acacia koa
Common Name(s): Koa, Hawaiian koa
Sources: Hawaii

Characteristics

Color can be highly variable, but tends to be medium golden or reddish brown, similar to Mahogany. There are usually contrasting bands of color in the growth rings, and it is not uncommon to see boards with ribbon-like streaks of color. Boards figured with wavy and/or curly grain are also not uncommon.

Grain/ Texture

Grain is usually slightly interlocked, and sometimes wavy. Uniform medium to coarse texture.
 

Workability

In most circumstances, Koa is easy to work, and sands well. However, figured wood, or pieces with heavily interlocked grain can be difficult to plane or machine without tearing or chipping of the grain; also, Koa can occasionally give problems in gluing, though this is somewhat uncommon. Koa turns, stains, and finishes well.

Uses

Veneer, furniture, cabinetry, musical instruments (especially guitars and ukuleles), canoes, gunstocks, carvings, bowls, and other turned/specialty wood objects.

Availability

With the tree endemic to Hawaii only, and with supplies dwindling, Koa is likely to be rather expensive. Also,  boards of highly figured and/or curly Koa can command fantastic prices.